GARP 2017

Codfish Hollow Barnstormers and Moeller Nights Presents:

GARP 2017

Israel Nash, Pearly Gate Music, Vera, JE Sunde, Amasa Hines, Bully, Hunterchild, The Weeks, Clarke and the Himselfs

Fri, Sep 08, 2017 - Sat, Sep 09, 2017

6:00 pm

$55.00

This event is all ages

Friday, September 8th and Saturday, September 9th, 2017.

Doors at 5 PM Friday

Doors at NOON on Saturday

Free camping both nights

This year, Nathaniel Rateliff will headline Friday night with his first full folk set in years, performing his much-loved songs from albums "Falling Faster Than You Can Run," "In Memory of Loss" and "Closer." Then Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats will headline Saturday night, making a highly anticipated return to the barn.

Israel Nash
Israel Nash
Cosmos-wrangling Americana upstart Israel Nash returns from Texas Hill Country with his Silver Season, a deeply gorgeous and wholly immersive nine-song set that plays less like an album, and more like a cross section of time and space. The man’s fourth LP ventures farther down the acid-soaked trail blazed by 2013’s Rain Plans, arriving in lush and expansive territory. Here, this Missouri son sounds more assured than ever, supported by his highly capable band and production inspired by psychedelic greats. Israel Nash’s Silver Season is best played loudly, and sounds wonderful in headphones.
Like the record before it, this one was made on Nash’s 15-acre swath of land in Dripping Springs, Texas, with one key difference. While Rain Plans was recorded inside of the new home he shared with his then-pregnant wife, Silver Season was born in the studio Nash built outside and named Plum Creek Sound, a 1,400 square- foot Quonset erected in March. The band was ready to begin in late May when the floods came, filling the building with water and muck. Nash and the boys pushed on anyhow. Digging trenches, hauling sandbags, clearing mud, and plugging in—that’s how they made an album, doing what needed to be done.
The end result isn’t so terrestrial, however. Silver Season billows outward with its opening song, “Willow.” A swirl of keys, bass, pedal steel, acoustic strum, and languid drums envelop the listener as Nash’s cooed poetry recontextualizes the world through his daughter’s eyes. A shimmery Morricone-like passage carries us into “Parlour Song,” which sounds a little like Neil Young leading Tame Impala. “Sooner or later we’ll surrender our guns/But not until we’ve shot everyone,” Nash sings. And while the line would fit into a celebratory tale about Old West outlaws, it’s actually a modern lament.
From the warm drift and easy elasticity of “Strangers” (one of two cuts that verge on seven minutes) to the holler-along gospel of “The Rag & Bone Man,” Silver Season feels like a living thing. That’s a product of the wild five-man sessions that took place in the sweltering Quonset (with beer breaks, and slingshot target practice using the empties). It’s also due to the care put into taming all of that good noise, with engineer Ted Young (Kurt Vile, Sonic Youth) returning to the mix. The analog hum grounds the guitar wizardry, while the depth of sound ties the band to the pasture that surrounds.
It makes sense that Nash would come into his own out there. He was raised in the Ozarks amidst hills and farmland. Other things add up too. His pastor father and artist mother were very much children of the ’60s. Dad bought him Sgt. Pepper’s when he was 10, Mom handed him an electric guitar at 11, and Nash was writing songs by 12. And while he’s grown away from the religion he was raised under, Nash’s music is nothing if not spiritual. The spirit just comes from a different place—nature, family, song, and the occasional trip into times and spaces we can’t normally access. Hidden within the folds of Silver Season, Nash’s weather-beaten voice says it best: “I don’t live like the others/I see twice as many colors.”
Pearly Gate Music
Pearly Gate Music
Pearly Gate Music is an incredibly gifted gentleman by the name of Zach Tillman (although he records and usually plays live with a stylistic variety of full-band options), who makes beautiful, challenging, simple-yet-complicated songs structured around his extraordinary singing, vivid lyrics, and unusual melodic sense. Sometimes conjuring the feeling of a punk rock religious revival in an old-time prairie tent, sometimes stripped down to spare acoustic-guitar-and-lovely-croon, Tillman's music sounds as if it were written and performed by a bedraggled dust bowl poet influenced by whatever popular songs from the poor folk circuit were being sung after dinner in the parlors of his youth — and who somehow managed to supernaturally absorb the sound of Lubbock circa 1955, Laurel Canyon circa 1968 and Berlin circa 1980.
Vera
Vera
Vera is the first solo project of a New York-raised poet, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist.
She spent many years touring—chiefly performing and recording with singer-songwriter Elvis
Perkins, as well as accompanying a number of other artists. She has contributed to film scores, and
provided music for theater and pieces of performance art. As for her own work, she has drifted
pseudonymously; performing solo in dark bars until early 2017, when she experienced a total shift in
relation to her voice and musicianship, and was finally compelled to record her secret songs.
Working out of a studio in St. Louis, Vera lived on a cot in the control room, a rotation of engineers
trading shifts on the console for her marathon sessions. During this period, she wrote, arranged and
performed all the parts on her upcoming LP “Shades.”
The record itself was born more of intuition and surrender rather than formal planning. The whole
process was quick, all told over a dozen songs fully tracked, layer-by-layer, in less than 3 weeks.
And so from discarded metal, bones, footsteps myriad synths, a concert timpani and layers of her own
voice in chorus, in a palimpsest of twisted harmony--came a genre-bending, time-collapsing
commentary on personal and collective haunting.
Whether they are the footsteps of an extinct beast (Black Rhino Enterprises), the shadow-figures of a
dead or dying relationship (Small Minds), biblical first woman (The Cage), or the calling out of
wraith-like possessors of a stolen continent (The Colony). Each song tells the story of a woman’s
ghost. Each track is her shade.
The album will be released in early 2018.
JE Sunde
JE Sunde
Now I Feel Adored
JE Sunde’s sophomore LP is an exercise in careful subtraction. The first LP “Shapes that Kiss the Lips of God”, (which itself followed complex LPs with his former band The Daredevil Christopher Wright), was an exercise in layers of sound…built up and presented like a spinning fan seen through a kaleidoscope. This number two LP “Now I Feel Adored” strips away the slowed blades and peers through a clearer, but darker lens.
The detailed weavings of melody found on previous recordings by the Minneapolis based songwriter are present, as always in the light strums of nylon string guitar, piano (electric and acoustic), occasional strings, synths and percussion, but the real feature here is in the bass guitar and vocal. Referred to as a “bass forward” effort by Sunde himself and played by Andrew Thoreen of Har-Di-Har fame and at times Pat Keen…it shows. This bass presence is best heard on the track “Wedding Ring”, a kind of ode to commitment to belief. Juxtapose that with the shadowy tune “Prism”, a sad observance of the faults of man and perception (or lack of). The hint of darkness shows itself again on the reckoning tune “Capsize and Sink”…beware censors, there is a word or two that the FCC would not approve of there. All the tracks on this LP flow from the beginning number, a duet with Monica Martin of Phox on the Irish folk-type tune “I Will Smile When I Think of You”. The essence of a kind of full minimalism starts there…it takes some time to notice how little is going on with the richness of what is heard.
As opposed to his first LP which was recorded over a long-ish time and mostly by Sunde himself, this second offering was done in just a few sessions, with his core band of , Shane Leonard (Kalispell, Field Report), Andrew Thoreen and Pat Keen. Augment that with Marty Breuggemann on keys and a smattering of real strings and flute and the sound becomes its realized self. The production quality of Hi Fi and vintage meets 70s am radio softness permeates the entire effort. The Victorian mansion in Neenah, Wisconsin that houses the studio sports a wood paneled dining room with a large table in the center where the band would share meals and breaks. The connections made at that table wove their way into the tightness and timbre of every track. This record will connect with anyone who sits at that metaphorical table to listen.

Preface from 'Now I Feel Adored'
The songs that constitute this album found their beginnings somewhere between 2007 and 2016. My Attempts to Grow A Beard being the oldest. I wrote this in Eau Claire, WI and for years it had a bridge section that was ok, but ultimately unnecessary. If you want to hear that version, you can check out The Daredevil Christopher Wright Daytrotter session from July 30th, 2008. Called By Our Names is the youngest tune. It came together within the two months leading up to our time in the studio. Without fail, all the songs were completed within the twelve month leading up to the start of our recording in April 2016.
Considering the span of time represented by the origins of these tunes, I can’t say that there was a unifying poetic concept that wove these songs into a collection. That is, beyond the generally unifying fact that, with the exception of Jacket, I wrote them all and it’s become clear to me that my thematic interests are rather narrow (Love, uncertainty, existential and metaphysical questions. Rinse and repeat). However, at the risk of retrofitting a through-line into the album where there isn’t one, I will say that three words did stick out to me as I considered the possibility of just such a thing, “Why, hope, trust.” Perhaps that is general enough to mean nothing at all or maybe there is something there. Regardless I hope that these songs prove to be helpful. They were a help to me to write.
J.E.S
Minneapolis, MN
October 2, 2016
Amasa Hines
Amasa Hines
Amasa Hines is a seven piece, Little Rock, Arkansas based band whose sound is as big as their influences are wide. Their influences come from a diverse range of Soul, Afro-Beat, Psychedelic, Blues, Dub, and Indie Rock stylings.

Amasa Hines was formed in 2010 and their debut album All The World There Is was released in January of 2014.
Bully
Bully
The word "bully" has a negative connotation in 2015, one heavy with menace and violence. A bully is an instigator, an aggressorsomeone who can spot your weaknesses and exploit them mercilessly. It's a curious name for a Nashville quartet that is transforming familiar '90s alt-rock (Dinosaur Jr, Pavement, Weezer) into smart, sharp-edged millennial indie rock, but "bully" is certainly an apt description for the band's churning guitars, rambunctious rhythms, and tightly coiled intensity. Their debut Feels Like sounds alternately like a balled fist and a fresh bruise.
More crucially, the word "bully" is a perfect distillation of frontwoman Alicia Bognanno's visceral approach to songwriting. She trades in steely observations, raw-nerve confessions, and intense anger directed almost exclusively at herselfalthough a few bystanders and bad exes might get caught in the crossfire. Her voice rises from sugar-sweet to scratchy howl as she bares her most harrowing fears to the world. In other words, Bognanno is her own bully.
Not merely the band's vocalist, songwriter, guitarist, and all-around visionary, she is also Bully's producer and engineer. Her musical life in music is inseparable from her experiences studying audio techniques and technology. Growing up in Minnesota, Bognanno often made up her own lyrics and melodiesnothing so complete as a songbut it wasn't until her senior year of high school that she found an outlet for those creative urges. "I took an audio engineering class at this alternative school," she recalls, adding that sessions were held at the local zoo. "Suddenly, it was like, Wow! I have a way to record stuff. Now I need to figure out how to play an instrument." She learned piano quickly, but guitar was more difficult; she had more fun using Logic Pro X to loop beats for some of her friends who were aspiring rappers.
Audio engineering engaged her in ways that other subjects had not, and Bognanno credits her teacher with recommending an inexpensive four-year Bachelor of Science program at Middle Tennessee State University, about thirty miles south of Nashville. There she immersed herself in courses in recording techniques, music theory and history, even copyright law. She even took another stab at guitar, this time with better results. "I think learning just some basic theory helped a lot, but I think it was because I picked up an electric guitar instead of an acoustic," she explains. "It was a lot more fun."
While the school emphasized digital recording, Boganno became obsessed with analog equipment. Part of the attraction was the richer and roomier sound, which opens up new and livelier textures in the instruments. "It's hard to bust out of what your instructors are showing you and what all your classmates are doing," she says, "but there were two teachers who maintained the tape machines, and they gave me lessons on the mechanics and techniques."
Bognanno used that experience to pursue an internship at Electrical Audio, the Chicago studio complex owned by Steve Albini and host to legendary sessions by some of Bully's heroes and biggest influences: the Breeders, Liz Phair, Superchunk, even the Stooges. When she returned to Tennessee, she started working at a local studio (Battle Tapes), ran sound at one of the best venues in town (the Stone Fox), and formed Bully as essentially a solo project backed by a trio of friends: Stewart Copeland on drums, Clayton Parker on guitar, and Reece Lazarus on bass.
Despite Bognanno's expertise as an audio engineer, the band is less a studio entity than a stage act, one that has quickly developed a reputation for its ferocious live shows (the Nashville Scene named Bully the top local band in its 2014 Best of Nashville issue.) On record, Bognanno strives to retain the band's formidable guitar attack while highlighting her boldly candid lyrics. "At this point in my life I always want everything I make to sound like we're playing live," she explains. "That's why I didn't put any keyboards or any extra stuff on there. Some people don't like that, but I had to go with my gut."
The band recorded live at Electrical Audio, doing as few takes as possible. Once they'd gotten a good performance, the songs were mixed immediately, not merely to save time but to preserve the excitable urgency of the music. Overseeing every part of the process put extra pressure on Bognanno to deliver some truly unbridled vocal performances. She practically screams the lyrics to opener "I Remember," documenting her memories of a curdled romance as the guitars roar and tumble behind her:
I remember showing up at your house
I remember hurting you so much
And I remember the way your sheets smelled!
It made for an intense session. "Stuart was trying to get some footage while we were in the studio, and he said he couldn't be in the same room with me while I was recording those vocals. It was just too intense. I don't even know how it comes out of me."
A deeply personal album by an artist bravely mining her own life, Feels Like is all about trying to figure yourself outabout holding yourself accountable and acting like an adult in a society that doesn't offer very many good examples. It's a coming-of-age album, which only makes Bognanno more relatable. "Sometimes I wonder if people think I'm a complete mess," she says. "It's not easy to put yourself out there like, but it's true. Everyone goes through shit like that."
Hunterchild
Hunterchild
Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Luke Aaron Jones and fellow Dreamers of the Ghetto alum Marty Sprowles pared down the widescreen stadium-sized rock of their former band to the more intimate, introspective Hunterchild. Jones' vocals are more arresting than ever, indebted as much to vintage Peter Gabriel, Prince, and Depeche Mode as the rich well of electronic R&B explorations from a similar orbit as James Blake and The Weeknd in their most powerful moments. Hunterchild are comfortable in their own skin in a way that's almost unheard of for debut artists.
The Weeks
The Weeks
Raucous Mississippi rock combo the Weeks got their start early, forming in 2006 while all four of the members were still in highschool. Staffed by twin brothers Cyle (lead vocals) and Cain Barnes (drums), Samuel Williams (guitar, vocals), and Damien Bone (bass), things picked up quickly for the Jackson-based quartet, who signed to the Esperanza Plantation label and released their debut, Cadillac Comeback, in 2008. Their swaggering, sludgy, and slightly Southern indie rock was further expanded on a follow-up EP, Rumspringa, which came out a year later. Following their self-released second album, Dry Land Is Not a Myth, the Weeks packed up and moved to Nashville, where they signed a new deal with Kings of Leon's label, Serpents and Snakes. With the new label deal came higher exposure for their hooky third LP, Gutter Gaunt Gangster, as they continued to dial in their freewheeling rock sound. Their Serpents and Snakes follow-up, 2014's horn-laden Dear Bo Jackson, saw a further expansion of their sound and put them in front of European audiences while touring with Kings of Leon. A year later, the four-song Buttons EP acted as a placeholder while the Weeks hunkered down at Memphis' legendary Ardent Studios to record their fifth album, 2017's Easy.
Clarke and the Himselfs
Clarke and the Himselfs
Clarke and the Himselfs is the sonically extended portion of Clarke Aleksandr Howell. What originally began with multi-track records, transmographied into the full band it is today, with Howell using the drums, guitar, his voice, and no loops, creating catchy, dark, powerful sounds that are supported ultimately by the gravity of the songs themselves.

2015 will see 'The Well Rounded Clarke and the Himselfs', his seminal LP, as well as a full length from 'Clarke and the Himselfs and Friends' (the five + piece full band version) both being released on Vinyl through Brett Netson's Scavenger Cult.
Venue Information:
Codfish Hollow Barnstormers
5013 288th Ave
Maquoketa, IA, 52060
http://codfishhollowbarnstormers.com/