Susto Fine 2Day Fest

Codfish Hollow Barnstormers and Moeller Nights Presents:

Susto Fine 2Day Fest

The Artisanals, Human Resources, Crab Claw, Babe Club

Fri, Aug 10, 2018 - Sat, Aug 11, 2018

8:00 pm

$20 - $25

This event is all ages

Doors at 6 PM

Music at 8 PM

DISCLAIMER: By purchasing this ticket, the ticket holder voluntarily assumes all risks in attending the event, whether occurring before, during or after the event, and releases Codfish Hollow Barnstormers LLC and its agents from all related claims.

Susto
Susto
Justin Osborne needed a break.
He'd been writing music and making albums since he was 15, and by the age of 26, he felt like he was spinning his wheels. He knew he needed a change, so he ended his old band Sequoyah Prep School and moved to Cuba. He thought he might be done with music for a while, but the songs just kept coming.
"I had this idea in my mind that I was going to try and join some kind of Latin American Leftist movement. I wanted to jump off a cliff," Osborne says. "Once I got there I immediately started hanging out with musicians and going to shows. I started showing them the songs from this project that was kind of just an idea in my head.
"They were like, 'man, don't throw away your passport, go home and continue to make music,'" he says. "I was encouraged by them to try again."
Osborne ended the relationship he was in, started touring and writing constantly and eventually dropped out of school with just one paper and exam left to finish. He also made an aesthetic upgrade, getting the words "Acid Boys" tattooed across his knuckles.
"I was always afraid of committing fully to the idea of trying to make it. I think in some ways, that's what held my old band back. I thought maybe I'll go to school and I'll be an anthropologist and go live abroad," he says. "Then I did all that, and I realized no, I need to go back to what I'm good at. I got the knuckle tattoos to keep me out of everything else."
Osborne was already writing the songs for what would be SUSTO's 2014 self-titled debut when his producer Wolfgang Zimmerman introduced him to Johnny Delaware, a guitarist and songwriter who had moved to Charleston, South Carolina to make an album with the producer.
"We started meshing and gelling really well. We liked aspects of what each other did, so as the record started to really take shape in the studio, Johnny came in and really played a key role in that," Osborne says. "At that point, it became one step closer to being a band thing."
SUSTO is a Spanish word referring to a folk illness in Latin America that Osborne learned as anthropology student, meaning "when your soul is separated from your body," and also roughly translates to a panic attack. For Osborne, the music of SUSTO was something he had to get out into the world.
"Going through my life I was just lost, and I didn't have direction, and I wanted direction," he says. Raised in Puddin' Swamp, South Carolina, Osborne moved to Charleston to attend military school, and didn't really get to experience much of the city -- one of the main artistic hubs of the South -- until he left his junior year to tour with his first band.
"I did acid for the first time. I started to gradually grow away from religion. I started to become my own person when I moved to Charleston," he says, adding that it's an especially great place to play music because "people are into all kinds of stuff. They go out to shows. I wouldn't say Charleston is a country music town or an indie rock town, it's just a town where people like cool shit, so I think that people appreciate creativity when it comes to creating a genre instead of working within one that exists."
SUSTO released their debut album independently and toured relentlessly to get the word out. They were an immediate hit in their hometown, packing venues, getting airplay at all the bars and even making a fan of Band of Horses' Ben Bridwell. "I got an e-mail from him, telling me he loved the record and wanted to meet with me and Johnny," he says. "That was actually the day I wrote my professor, and I said, 'I'm not coming in.'"
But that wasn't enough. "I was like, 'we can't just make it in Charleston.' My friends in the band Shovels & Ropes told me once, 'it's a big country and we got to get out there and get everybody.'"
The members of the live band that Osborne and Delaware recruited -- Corey Campbell (guitar, keys, backing vocals), Jenna Desmond (bass), and Marshall Hudson (drums, percussion) contributed to SUSTO's new album & I'm Fine Today, which will be released via Caroline. "We just wanted to go further. We started something with the first record, and we want to keep going in that direction," Osborne says of the album, which finds them taking the spacey country rock of their debut into the stratosphere, piling on layers of sighing keyboards, galloping rhythms and frayed, noisy guitar solos atop wistful melodies and lyrics that examine growing up and growing into yourself. Much of the album was recorded by Osborne, Delaware and Zimmerman, with the other members contributing as needed.
On "Hard Drugs," Osborne muses about reconnecting with an estranged friend during a personal crisis ("I'm thankful that I have some friends that are totally fine with me telling some stories about things we've all been through together") and on "Mystery Man," Delaware writes about "the feeling of appreciation for someone coming into your life, someone like yourself." On "Wasted Mind," one of the most personal songs on the album, Osborne, and Delaware reflect on the journey they've been through together.
"We wrote that [song] about finally having a voice that was being heard, and about trying and failing and then finally getting some ears to listen to you," he says. "It's about the ups and downs of that, and how you get to travel, and you're just kind of in and out of people's lives, and it's hard but beautiful, and also how you start to come out of the haze of partying and start thinking about your life's value."
In many ways, "Wasted Mind" is & I'm Fine Today in miniature, as the album circles around the theme of punching through life's difficulties and learning to be comfortable with the person you've grown into. "I feel like I am better. We put the first record out, and we worked hard, and it just feels like a good place to be," he says, noting that while the first record focused on his own struggles, & I'm Fine Today is more concerned with looking at the world beyond the struggles in your head.
"I've learned to appreciate the fact that I just get to be here. It's all perspective," he says. "This album is about coming to terms with yourself and feeling okay with your place in the universe."
The Artisanals
The Artisanals
The Artisanals are a Charleston, SC based band that coalesced in late 2016. Fronted by the Charleston City Paper’s 2015 Singer-Songwriter of the Year, Johnny Delaware (formerly of SUSTO) and an all-star cast of local musicians, the Americana rock outfit has already shared the stage with global powerhouse Band of Horses on several U.S. dates. Having also played with Americana mainstays Nikki Lane, J. Roddy Walston, Daniel Romano, and Dylan LeBlanc, the band is set to break out in 2018 and has been featured in the Huffington Post, Paste Magazine, Daytrotter, PopMatters, & more.


Produced by The Artisanals with Wolfgang Zimmerman, the forthcoming LP Literally, Anywhere is the first ever record to come out of the Magic Barn--a studio-converted barn in Iowa that was built around the Neve console and gear from New York City's now-defunct Magic Shop Studio. Open from 1988 until March of 2016, the Magic Shop was a sought-after studio beloved by countless legends like Lou Reed and Blondie, for its vintage gear. Arcade Fire tracked The Suburbs there, and David Bowie recorded his last two albums, including Blackstar, at the Soho spot.

With sonic influences ranging from the dream-pop work of George Harrison (“Angel 42”) to the stone-cold radio hits of bands like the Killers (“Roll With It”), the nine-track LP showcases Delaware and Houle’s knack for writing hooks as well as their ear for quality production. The album utilizes everything from a gong, organ, piano, sitar, French horn, trombone, and koto, to a string section sourced from the nearby University of Iowa. There’s no filler here; from start to finish, this record is a straight banger.

Also worthy of note, the Artisanals recorded some songs at 432 Hz--the frequency of the universe. Delaware isn’t superstitious, but he’s aware of the ethereal bond between human beings and the cosmos that surrounds us. “You have to be awake in this life,” he says, “There’s a lot of subtle clues--if you’re awake, you can read into them and know where to go.” It’s this perceptive attention to detail that makes Literally, Anywhere stand out.


A native of South Dakota, Delaware’s formative years took him all over the United States, and he remains something of a nomad today. In college, he found himself skipping classes to write and record music, and eventually dropped out to pursue music full-time. Nashville was the first stop on this journey--as it is for so many others--but after only a month in the Music City, he was disillusioned with the dog-eat-dog industry-types and relocated to Albuquerque, NM. Living in a trailer house, he would eventually set his sights on Austin, TX, another legendary music town, where he met Luke Mitchell (The High Divers) from Charleston. The two hit it off and Delaware felt a calling to join the budding music scene in the coastal Carolina town. The transition wasn’t easy, as he was living paycheck-to-paycheck in Austin and had no money to finance another move. Ultimately, divine intervention struck when a thunderstorm came through Austin--a tree fell on his car, and he was able to file an insurance claim and use the lump sum to move to Charleston. He recalls it was “the only tree that fell down in the whole goddamn city.”

Years later, having enlisted guitarist Clay Houle, drummer Josh Hoover (who studied drum performance at Indiana University), and a slew of other Charleston music luminaries, the Artisanals are poised to reach the Americana masses with their debut LP. Literally, Anywhere is the culmination of the collective’s years of unique individual experiences writing, recording, touring, and living life one day at a time. “Inspiration is like an invisible ghost...it’s your friend, and it kind of takes you over. You’re a conduit for it...that’s what musicians are; these modern-day shamans that take inspiration and give it form through song. It’s a lot like magick.”

Focused on writing new material and hitting the road hard, rest assured the Artisanals are going to continue to “Pound the Rock” in 2018 and beyond. Go forth, friends.
Human Resources
Human Resources
Human Resources is an American alternative pop-rock band from Charleston, SC. Formed in 2015 by Dries Vandenberg, Aaron Utterback, Paul Chelmis, and Matt Zutell, HR quickly adopted a unique role in the blossoming Charleston music scene as a more pop-centric counterpart to the neo-southern and indie rock acts prevalent in the area at the time.
The band’s debut single “Queen” and the subsequent L.P. En Route (2015) were released to positive local reviews, earning noteworthy traction on Spotify and other streaming services. The debut played a key role in earning HR the “Electronic/Experimental Band of the Year” award from the Charleston City Paper.
The follow-up campaign Pizza Dreams (2016) matched the trajectory of it’s predecessor, eventually earning the band a second consecutive City Paper Award, and producing another successful single, “Bad News” which helped the band extend its reach to the national level.
In 2017 Human Resources began work on their third release. As with En Route and Pizza Dreams, the band will utilize the talents of drummer Matt Zutell (Coast Records) for the majority of the production needs, continuing a long standing tradition of self production. In addition to Zutell, HR will tap LA based producer Taylor Locke, founding member of Rooney, at his studio The Velveteen Laboratory for initial production work.
Crab Claw
Crab Claw
Charleston, SC. Alt-Rock supergroup collaboration featuring members from Brave Baby, SUSTO, The High Divers, Johnny Delaware, and Band of Horses.
Babe Club
Babe Club
Corey and Jenna!
Venue Information:
Codfish Hollow Barnstormers
5013 288th Ave
Maquoketa, IA, 52060
http://codfishhollowbarnstormers.com/