GARP 2018

Codfish Hollow Barnstormers and Moeller Nights Presents:

GARP 2018

Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats, Nathaniel Rateliff, Texas Gentlemen, Cactus Blossoms, Campdogzz, Matthew Logan Vasquez, Bluebook, The Dawn, Okey Dokey, Sam Evian, Bad Licks, Joe Sampson, Jess Parsons, Kirby Brown, Small Houses, Vera Sola, Katie Von Schleicher, Emma Snowden, Miles Nielsen and the Rusted Hearts, Michigan Rattlers, Lee DeWyze

Fri, Sep 28, 2018 - Sat, Sep 29, 2018

7:00 pm

$25.00 - $60.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

Doors at 4 PM

Show at 5:45 PM

Friday
Nathaniel Rateliff (folk set)
Matthew Logan Vasquez
Cactus Blossoms
Miles Nielsen &The Rusted Hearts
Small Houses
Blue Book
Bad Licks
Vera Sola
Jess Parsons

Lee DeWyze

Doors at NOON

Show at 1:45 PM

Saturday
Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
Texas Gentlemen
Okey Dokey
Campdogzz
Kirby Brown
Sam Evian
Katie Von Schleicher
Kyle Emerson 
Joe Sampson
The Dawn

Emma

Michigan Rattlers

LOLO

Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats
Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats
Nathaniel Rateliff
Nathaniel Rateliff
Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats
Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats
Nathaniel Rateliff
Nathaniel Rateliff
Texas Gentlemen
Texas Gentlemen
Sometimes, authenticity can sneak up on you. The first sounds you hear on The Texas Gentlemen’s debut studio album, TX Jelly, is that of a band slowly coming together.
It’s deceptive, because it creates the impression these Gentlemen might be hesitant about their first record, but any hint of uncertainty vanishes as the core quintet — Beau Bedford, Nik Lee, Daniel Creamer, Matt McDonald and Ryan Ake — tears into the opening track, Habbie Doobie, a low-slung piece of vintage country-funk that slams out of the speakers and announces The Texas Gentlemen as a force to be reckoned with.
This Lone Star-bred collective takes its cues from some of the iconic acts of the past — the quicksilver brilliance of The Wrecking Crew, The Muscle Shoals Swampers (who backed everyone from Aretha to Wilson Pickett), Booker T. and The M.G.’s, and Bob Dylan’s one-time backers The Band are the most obvious examples. Bedford, who shares chief engineering and producing responsibilities at Dallas’ Modern Electric Sound Recorders, assembled The Texas Gentlemen as an all-purpose backing band for an eclectic array of singer-songwriters, including Leon Bridges, Nikki Lane, and more.
In 2016, the Gentlemen were lured out of the studio to the Newport Folk Festival, where they were joined by iconic troubadour Kris Kristofferson, making his first Newport appearance in more than 45 years. Rolling Stone called it one of the festival’s “most exciting sets.”
Kristofferson so enjoyed collaborating with The Texas Gentlemen that he enlisted them to reprise their roles in a series of critically acclaimed Texas concerts. Of Kristofferson and The Texas Gentlemen’s appearance at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, music critic Preston Jones wrote “The [instruments] would slowly coalesce around Kristofferson’s gnarled but still potent voice, creating an electric sensation of the past fusing with the present.”
That deft fusion of before and right now is possible thanks to the musicians’ unswerving dedication to simply playing to the best of their abilities, trusting their instincts, and letting the music guide them. Case in point: TX Jelly was created in less than a week — four days, start to finish — at Muscle Shoals’ singular FAME Studios.
Pared down from the 28 songs the Gentlemen recorded in that 96-hour span, TX Jelly effortlessly connects way back to what’s next, summoning the spirits of American songcraft even as it heralds the arrival of 21st century talent. Cut live, with little use for the blinding polish and careful presentation of so much modern music, TX Jelly oozes with skill backed up by that hard-won authenticity.
TX Jelly moves between contemplative and raucous, encompassing the full breadth of the American experience. The music touches on blues, soul, folk, country, rock and gospel — from first track to last, you can feel The Texas Gentlemen reaching deep inside themselves and finding what’s genuine — what illuminates the truth of the country’s rich, complicated and singular artistic history — and delivering it the only way they know how: real, raw and righteous.
Cactus Blossoms
Cactus Blossoms
When my brother and I started making music as The Cactus Blossoms there wasn't a big plan. We cut our teeth performing some well known and obscure country songs that were popular or unpopular pre-1960, partly out of curiosity and deep appreciation, but mostly because it was fun. Early on we were given a residency at the Turf Club in St. Paul, Minnesota. We got a band together and it became our weekly practice-in-public where we would pull out every song we could think of, no matter how well we knew it. It was our first chance to play all night and do whatever we wanted. Over the course of our year and a half at the Turf Club our repertoire had snowballed into an amalgam of original songs and a bunch of gut wrenching, tongue-in-cheek heartbreakers, that were 30 years older than us. Not everyone could tell what was new and what was old, and it didn't really matter. People just seemed to enjoy it. That's when the wheel got going and gave the illusion of spinning backwards. We weren't born in the wrong era. We just got into some music from a different era and found a way to make it our own.

Good fortune has followed us every step of the way, offering opportunities that seemed just beyond what we're ready for. It always stretches us out and makes us feel lucky as hell. When JD McPherson called and said he was interested in producing our record, it was the latest in a series of serendipitous events that brought us to where we are today. We opened for him at a gig in our hometown Minneapolis a few months earlier and had met him briefly, but never could have imagined that within a year we would be collaborating on a new album and criss-crossing America on tour with his band. JD is a music connoisseur with the singing voice of an angel, the boundless creative energy of a child, a scholar's mind and the auditory perception of a wolf. This guy was the guy. He wanted to do something sparse and rhythmic with simple melodic arrangements and it lined up perfectly with the direction our new songs were leading us.

We wanted to record live with the best rhythm section we could find, in one room, playing together while we sang. It's not the easiest process, but it's the way we wanted to capture the music. JD pointed us to Chicago and enlisted the talents of engineer/drummer Alex Hall, guitarist Joel Paterson, and bassist Beau Sample. It felt like a musical dream team, but we had no idea what would happen. We barely knew these guys and they barely knew our music. On the morning of our first session Alex was setting up microphones and running cables through his vents from the living room down to the control room in the basement. The rest of us were drinking coffee in the kitchen and making small talk. JD was running back and forth cracking jokes, trying to decide what song was best to do first. Within a couple of hours "Queen Of Them All" was finished, and everyone knew we were in the right place at the right time.

The result, You're Dreaming, is the culmination of several years of songwriting and the kindness of thousands of miles and friends. With a cast of characters, experiences, and personal perspectives, set in simple rhymes and sung in harmony, we try to paint a picture in your mind.

-Jack & Page
Campdogzz
Campdogzz
Campdogzz are dialed into the bleak, spirited heart of the industrial Midwest. The Chicago-based five-piece band harbors driving rhythms, insistent dual guitars set in intriguing arrangements, and the haunting, evocative voice of Tulsa, OK-native Jess Price. Her melodies take on the shape of a storm making its way in -- and out just as soon. There’s a feeling of electricity, of winds shifting, a magical mix of both comfort and unease.
Campdogzz have earned a devoted following iwith a solid line-up featuring Price (vocals, guitar, organ), Mikey Russell (guitar, backing vocals), Nick Enderle (guitar, synth), Andrew Rolfsen (bass), and Chris Dye (drums). In addition to their own headlining shows and a recent tour with Field Report, the band has opened for Big Thief, Sam Evian, Tim Kasher, Ohmme, and more. Campdogzz’s new album, In Rounds, was released August 3 on 15 Passenger, and they will be touring with Cursive this fall. More at https://www.campdogzz.com/
Matthew Logan Vasquez
Matthew Logan Vasquez
Matthew Logan Vasquez is feeling optimistic.
That’s not necessarily apparent the first time you spin his new full-length solo album. Each track on Matthew Logan Does What He Wants feels urgent and intense. Impatient landlords, financial woes and other frustrations fan the agitation embedded in the opening track, “Same.” Isolation darkens the brooding images of “From Behind The Glass.” Death takes a bow on “The Fighter.” Vasquez can’t help but juxtapose the celebration of “Fatherhood” with a lament that “we ain’t got the money to pay the hospital.” The music enhances this impression. As fans of his work with Delta Spirit and Middle Brother know well, Vasquez knows how to fuse passion and poetry in his writing and then ignite this volatile mix with extraordinarily expressive singing. In this sense he stands as a peer and a worthy successor to those who influenced him as an up-and-coming artist — Neil Young, Kurt Cobain, Pink Floyd, Lou Reed and others often mentioned, none of them known for their upbeat, sunny lyrics. With the 2016 release Solicitor Returns. “That last record had a sarcastic, darker tone. The new one is just as hard-hitting and wide-ranging but with a more positive message.” This becomes clearer when you replay Does What He Wants and listen more carefully. On the surface, “Tall Man” unfolds as a journey into self-destruction. But at the end, the subject of the story is repeating “I know I can change,” each time with escalating emotion as brought to life in Vasquez’s searing vocal. “Bad things happen in the song,” he acknowledges. “But it all leads to an epiphany. And that is positive. The truth rarely comes to you in an easy way — not unless you’re a wiser person than I am. “My point is that life is a struggle,” Vasquez continues. “But how can you have optimism and hope if you don’t have something negative? Context is what makes it meaningful.” For Vasquez, context involves drawing from dramatically different settings. Growing up in Texas and along the California coast, hunkering down for years in Brooklyn as he finessed his music in a more pressurized urban context and then heading back to Austin to put all the pieces together, he took note of the differences and similarities these places offered. During much of that time he channeled his experiences into Delta Spirit, whose albums inspired critics to laud the band as “restless and defiant” (Paste), its music infused by “waves of measured ferocity” (Uncut) and “significant depth” (Austin Chronicle). Vasquez was actually in the process of writing for a projected upcoming Delta Spirit project early last year when he began to think that it might be more appropriate to focus instead on his next solo effort. “I was imagining a new Delta Spirit album as I was writing,” he says. “But I began to realize that’s not exactly where I’m at right now. The band isn’t broken up but it’s not coming back right now. I started to feel like Rhett Miller, who had to go away from the Old 97s for a while so he could get tap into his creativity and come back to the band in a new and healthy way.” To keep his path clear and work on his own terms, Vasquez built a studio in his home for this past year — a trailer parked about an hour west of Austin. Here, in Texas Hill Country, surrounded by evergreen oak trees, he wrote and recorded basic tracks and then brought in singer Kam Franklin from The Suffers and Shakey Graves drummer Christopher Booshada to add parts as needed. For backup vocals and string parts, he worked long-distance via sound files with the Parkington Sisters, who he performed with during a Middle Brother set at last year’s Newport Folk Festival. “They performed a miracle, giving me a 3-D depth that makes the tracks they appear on jump out of the speakers,” he insists. In final form, Does What He Wants is like a hall of mirrors, each capturing a different image of one self-aware and restlessly creative individual. The pure finger-picked acoustic guitar that sets up vivid stories on “The Informant” and “Tall Man,” the retro textures of “Headed West” (which, Vasquez points out, were actually played on real strings by the Parkingtons), the lofting melody that evokes Roy Orbison (“the greatest singer in the history of singers,” Vasquez opines), the waterfall of harmonies in “The Fighter” — This music is diverse yet unified, which of course was a priority for its author. And, in the end, it turns out to feel pretty optimistic after all — a perfect statement for these times and possibly for some time to come.
The Dawn
The Dawn
For over 10 years, the Western Illinois based roots rock/jam band "The Dawn" has been spreading their love of cutting edge improvisational rock throughout the Midwest.  From their humble beginnings in the shadow of the Mississippi River, they have crafted out their place as one of the premier up and coming jam bands.

The Dawn's live show experience has proven contagious and is tightly gripped in spacious jams, roaring guitar and soulful harmonies.  Now a six-piece, The Dawn pushes the envelope at every performance and audiences are rewarded with an experience that can only be described as "The Dawn Effect." Coupled with an equally adventurous light show, The Dawn concerts keep their dedicated and growing fanbase coming back for more.  

Staples of the Quad Cities’ jam scene for years, The Dawn’s 2014 release Waiting On The Storm was received with excellent reviews and helped catapult the band to major festival experiences including the inaugural Phases of the Moon, Summer Camp and Camp Euforia.

This momentum has continued to build over the last two years with more major festival appearances including playing host to their own “Dawn and On” Music Festival, drawing over 1000 fans its first two years.  Combined with high profile club gigs, the Dawn is turning many heads in the jam scene.
Okey Dokey
Okey Dokey
You can't fully appreciate the long history of recorded music without taking the time to look at the breakups. Whether it's for good or for the season, Okey Dokey is the product of that natural reformation that occurs when musicians part ways. Fronted by visual artist Aaron Martin and The Weeks' guitarist Johny Fisher, these two former band mates made the rare decision to revisit creating music together in Fisher's small cabin about 20 miles outside of Nashville, TN. What occurred was a well blended mix of everything they loved about classic Motown combined with a dash of their psychedelic storytelling roots. With the record and touring band including a revolving group of musicians from bands such as Wild Child, The Weeks, Rayland Baxter Band (Practice), Morning Teleportation, Ron Gallo and Sol Cat, their upcoming debut album 'Love You, Mean It' has a little bit of treasure for every type of listener. — Johny Fisher (Guitars)
Aaron Martin (Vocal)

The Band:
Sam Williams
Damien Bone
Kole Sharp
Chris Plank
Sam Evian
Sam Evian
As it has been said: no matter where you go, there you are. With his new album You, Forever, Sam Evian, the project of New York-based musician, songwriter, and producer Sam Owens, is here to add some eternity to that sentiment.

“This is You, Forever,” he says. “It’s about accepting that you are responsible for you, that you’re in charge of your actions. Everything you do affects others and yourself, so, no matter what you choose to do, be there and learn from it.”

It’s a mantra that powers self-starter Owens, a producer and sound engineer by trade who entered the scene with his debut Sam Evian full-length, Premium, in the fall of 2016. The notion takes on a dual meaning that is echoed across You,Forever.

“There’s a ton of romance on the record,” he says. “Maybe it’s all romance.”

You, Forever is Owens’s first foray into a more soul-baring sensibility and places the artist directly in the sightlines and heartlines of his listeners. The album (as well as 2017’s “Need You,” a collaboration with the multi-hyphenate musician Chris Cohen) was written on the heels of his experience touring Premium with his band and was recorded across the latter half of last year. The tours—which included opening shows for bands like Big Thief, Whitney, Teenage Fanclub, Luna, Nick Hakim and Lucius—taught him much about feel and interaction. Further fueled by a desire to escape from the glow of screens and to embrace a sense of limitation, he quickly developed a new set of instrumental songs written for a band rather than just himself and recorded them on a Tascam four-track cassette recorder in his parents’ house in North Carolina.

“Just like most people, my recording studio day job had me staring at a computer eight hours a day,” he says. “I just needed to get away from the glowing rectangle. The only way to do that was to work on tape. The four-track is so limiting; you’re forced to get only the bones of the song down. You can’t do any overdubs, so it was fun to work on that with the experience of the live band behind me. And something about playing my family’s instruments in the garage where I grew up spurred a set of songs that became the new record.”

Inspired by these limiting techniques, Owens borrowed an eight-track reel-to-reel tape recorder from a friend, rented a house in upstate New York, and took his band – Brian Betancourt (bass), Austin Vaughn (drums), Adam Brisbin (guitar), and Hannah Cohen (backup vocals) – there to record the new album in July of 2017. Focusing on instrumental grooves and the vibe he had achieved on the original four-track recordings, Owens found the process so enlightening he decided to up the ante yet again by banning tuning pedals from the house.

“Tuning pedals make it so easy to sound good together, so when you eliminate them it takes everything back to the ’60s, which is when all my favorite records were born,” he says. “It makes everything more questionable, weird, and unruly in a really simple way.”

Dreamy album opener “IDGAF” explores the notion of embracing one’s passions and pursuing one’s goals no matter the impositions in their path. On one hand a subtle stand against the current political climate and on another a call to be responsible, Owens calls it a romantic song that embodies his act of self-mixing his record: “I had to put myself aside and let the music happen.”

“Health Machine” is a crunchy, slow-burning but deliberate stomper glowing with warm electric guitar, saxophone wailing, and Owens’s reverb-laden lyrics that he says detail an abstract version of how he relates to his own physical form. “It’s about the unattainable health that I would like to imagine for myself on tour. The line ‘We slither out on a Tuesday feeling tired and hopeless’ is such a hilarious picture: four people in a minivan slithering out of Atlanta, Georgia, stopping at a CVS and getting a bunch of Zicam. Health is your job if you’re touring as a musician, although it’s a job I don’t do so well.”

“Country” is a fleet, nimble driving song written after Owens and his girlfriend (Hannah Cohen, who also sings throughout the album) took a cross-country road trip and encountered what they perceived to be a dust storm in rural Nevada. “For a hundred miles, we didn’t see a person or even a tree, then all of a sudden this giant dust cloud appeared which turned out to be ten cowboys on horses lassoing cows. It was the most real thing I’ve ever seen.” In fact, Owens wrote every song on the album with the act of driving-while-listening in mind, and says many of the lyrics came together following that life-changing road trip—the only time he has ever driven across America without anyone waiting on him to show up for a soundcheck. But despite the allure of the transient life, his heart belongs to one place.

“The record is about romance, and about my love for living in New York and trying to separate myself from any idea I had previously of living in New York,” he says. “I’ve kind of designed my own world there.”

Whether behind the wheel in the dust bowls of America, navigating the bustle of his adopted home, playing festival stages with rock legends, or getting back to basics in his parents’ garage, no matter where Sam Evian goes, there he is…forever.
Bad Licks
Bad Licks
You're pissed off?
So are we
Joe Sampson
Joe Sampson
Since his childhood days singing in his family’s barbershop quartet, up through his years collaborating with celebrated musicians like Nathaniel Rateliff and Esme Patterson, Joe Sampson has steadily sharpened his sound and style, becoming one of Denver’s most celebrated songwriters. Westword named him Songwriter of the Year in 2008, describing his work as “combining the emotional weight of acoustic breakup albums like Beck’s Sea Change or Ryan Adams’ Heartbreaker with an aw-fuck-it humour.”
Jess Parsons
Jess Parsons
With equal parts heartbreak and splendor, Jess Parsons' songs evoke the classic singer songwriters of the 70's with a touch of Rumour's-style world weariness. An alumnus of the "hauntingly hopeful" folk rock act Glowing House, she can also be seen performing alongside avant-double bass wunderkind Julie Davis in Bluebook.
Kirby Brown
Kirby Brown
Kirby Brown was born in Deep East Texas, raised in the Ozark foothills of north central Arkansas, and has since spent much of his life traversing an orbit between New York City, Nashville, and his mother state of Texas. From the idyllic, religious farm family he grew up in to the literate, creative communities of NYC, Brown's music is a synthesis of seemingly-disparate influences. His writing channels the long narrative of the American songbook without nostalgia — it bears the torch of traditional form while simultaneously showcasing an entirely original artist. His forthcoming album finds Kirby at his finest — at-once affable and conversational, while insightfully peeling back the layers of himself and the world around him. A "Poet Laureate of the Everyman," Kirby's writing proves to cast an uncommon redemptive hue onto the seemingly common world.
Small Houses
Small Houses
Small Houses is a Philadelphia, PA-based alternative country project featuring the songs and poems of Flint, MI-native Jeremy Quentin. Artfully crafted with finger-style guitar and softly sung melodies, the bars of his new album Still Talk; Second City describe the people, the love, and the homes of Quentin's life.

Still Talk; Second City is the result of a one yearlong effort, borne of the exhaustion from too much time spent moving. Prompted to flee to Atlanta with the intent of an indefinite stay, Quentin's eight months of living and recording was funded by various odd jobs and sleeping in the car – anything to keep the project alive. All-night restaurants and friends' homes were among the venues where he recalled the memories of the hometown suburbs that suffuse the album, while shades of influence from poets like James Wright, Jim Harrison, and Seamus Heaney hover like weighty ghosts in the background.

Featuring guest appearances by artists including Mike Brenner (Magnolia Electric Co., Songs:Ohia), Samantha Crain, Erin Rae (The Meanwhiles), and John Davey, Still Talk; Second City celebrates the survival of winning out of "the worst and the longest time" and the drive to create a home outside of the one we already had ("I want something better, mean weather, revelier" – "South, Southern"). Other songs struggle with the want and need to leave, but reveal the need missing, or withheld ("I hear you're lucky on me, honest, and torn to beat up my 99′′ – "Staggers and Rise"). "Still Talk" eavesdrops on imagined conversations, wished for but never had: "I want to make my real life static, real life when it's worth, braided veins and a headlight coming, and a real list of words saying, 'your mom and I still talk'".

Damon Moon, the album's producer and engineer, was inspired by the recording style of creators like Richard Swift (Foxygen, Tennis, Damien Jurado) and Roy Halee (Simon & Garfunkel, The Byrds), and took a hand in helping to write and serve as a sounding board across one of his most involved efforts to date.
Vera Sola
Vera Sola
A family of spiritualists, writers and performers generations deep; a home haunted by legends of literature and music; personal upheaval and a sense of being unseated in time: these are the origins of singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Vera Sola.

With an ethereal voice providing the foundation for a haunting body of song, her timeless sound and enthralling stage presence draws an unlikely connection between Vera Lynn and Vera Hall; the grande dame of British music hall and the Depression-era Alabamian singer of work-songs and spirituals.

As a child she played classical piano, later guitar and bass, learning more by instinct than instruction. An obsessive reader and writer, she’d forever written poetry and been fascinated by wordplay, falling in love at a young age with Russian literature and the work of Dylan Thomas, James Joyce and William Faulkner. All this, along with a career as a stage and voice actor—combined with years of touring in Elvis Perkins’ band—would serve as a launching point for Vera Sola.

But it wasn’t until early 2017, when she booked time at Native Sound Studio in St. Louis, that she began to experiment with the idea of recording her own material. She hadn’t even shared her music with her closest friends and family, let alone recorded anything of her own.

Even then, despite a lineage and lifetime of public performance, she felt a barrier blocking off her voice. Writing and playing came easily, but singing her own songs presented a different challenge. One she couldn’t explain and couldn’t quite shake.

That would all change. Just before she was to travel to St. Louis, a series of life-altering events marked a radical shift that reframed her relationship to her music. With everything she’d known to be true now unraveled, along with it vanished the fear that had prevented her from translating the sound in her blood into song.

Entering the studio, she abandoned plans to bring in other musicians. She decided instead to make the album entirely alone, picking up instruments she had never played before, drawing from them the internal music that had for so long gone unexpressed. She recorded using anything at hand. Bones and breaking glass, chains and filing cabinets, hammers and two-by-fours. Countless moving parts meticulously layered and arranged. And that old fear now cast off brought new abilities, a change in her voice, including an otherworldly vibrato. She’d become a vessel, capable of channeling at once her innermost self and yet something entirely beyond her.

What emerged from the sessions was her debut album, SHADES, a collection of ten finely-honed and immaculately-rendered ballads. Poems and stories delivered in a mannered but casually dismissive style–-full of sorrow, yet arch and wry. Songs of the present that conjure the past. Accounts of women and their ghosts: echoes of memories that just won’t quit; of relationships over or current but fleeting; of the extinction of species; the violent capture of a feminine landscape and the spirits that stick around long after; messengers from the other side.
Katie Von Schleicher
Katie Von Schleicher
Katie Von Schleicher rose from intern to artist on Brooklyn label Ba Da Bing with Bleaksploitation, a self-recorded 2015 mini album of irreverent, fuzz-laden tunes. On her debut full-length, Von Schleicher strikes again on the magic that comes from her warped and uncompromising sound. Shitty Hits channels the bright, sunny radio burners of the 1970’s, songs you drive to, carefree, and songs you can cry to, which The Guardian describe as “Portishead meets the Beatles,” and NPR’s Bob Boilen calls “one of those constant repeat records for me.”
Conjuring the home recorded sound of Paul McCartney’s McCartney or Jeff Buckley’s Sketches For My Sweetheart The Drunk, Shitty Hits was created on a tape machine at Von Schleicher’s childhood home in Maryland. Where Bleaksploitation courted a kind of sonic nihilism, Shitty Hits shows confidence, growth and unflinching self-realization. Inhabiting the roles of producer and engineer, Von Schleicher cements her voice as one to be reckoned with, parsed and pored over, on an album that is “never less than beguiling” (Pitchfork).
Emma Snowden
Emma Snowden
Miles Nielsen and the Rusted Hearts
Miles Nielsen and the Rusted Hearts
Songs.

Songs are the key.

Miles Nielsen has been writing them for as long as he can remember. Good, bad, great – yeah he's covered all those bases.

For some, music is something in the background, or in the corner of the bar, or merely something that lives on the other side of the dial – a magic diversion created to pass the time in the car. For Miles Nielsen, music is as much a part of his life as
the act of taking a breath, every experience, every conversation, every dream is a potential song in the making.

There are millions of people writing, recording and releasing music in today's world of immediate return. Learn three chords, turn on the computer and you have a worldwide release. There are very few, however, who are writing music that makes you immediately wish there was "more" – another song to make you turn up the volume , another nugget of melody or lyric that you can find some part of to make your own.

Miles's songs provide that sense of yearning and ownership. You want to have another record, another song – you want to hit rewind … you want to know more about this world created in song by Mr. Nielsen. A captivating wordsmith, instrumentalist, and creator of hooks – rare indeed, but present in the person of Miles Nielsen.

It would be hard to imagine that the years spent honing his craft throughout the bars and music halls of the Midwest, were not leading to something bigger, something permanent. His latest release, Miles Nielsen presents the Rusted Hearts certainly occupies a space of permanence – these songs are not mere throwaway pop songs – but, rather explorations and declarations of a mastery of style and substance, destined to fall into regular rotation on the turntables of fans new and old for years to come.

What is next? Like with any other prediction – no one can say. Gifts like Miles's come along very infrequently, and one can only hope that his ability to be so "in the now" – listening for the songs spoken in the everyday world will continue to grow.

Then maybe that "more" we are looking for, will be given to us via that very key we yearn for –

…through Songs.
Michigan Rattlers
Michigan Rattlers
Lifelong friends and deep-north natives, Michigan Rattlers play heavy-hearted folk-rock with an aching dose of Midwestern nice. Graham Young (guitar), Adam Reed (upright bass), and Christian Wilder (piano) began writing music and performing together in their Northern Michigan high school.
“Petoskey is a small place. Beautiful, but secluded. It’s hard to start a musical career in a place where there are more deer than people.”
Still, they regularly played every bar, cafe, and stage in town, developing a musical chemistry informed by the likes of AC/DC, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Bob Seger, and more.
After a few years apart, Reed and Young settled down in Los Angeles, recorded a short demo, and began playing locally. The demo found its way into the hands of super-producer Johnny K (Plain White T's, 3 Doors Down), and they cut the bulk of their first EP at NRG Studios in just one day.
"My favorite music is recorded that way," continues Reed. "You get in a room, plug in, and cut songs live. The energy of the recording comes directly from the physical performance, and it puts the listener into that specific time and place."
This self-titled Michigan Rattlers EP attracted glowing reviews from No Depression, Bluegrass Situation, B3 Science, and Rolling Stone, who named the band one of their “Ten New Country Artists You Need To Know” in 2016. They spent the rest of that year and much of the next touring in support of this release.
In September 2017, Pianist Christian Wilder was added to the band’s lineup. Now a trio, the group headed into the studio to record their newest EP, Wasting the Meaning. Comprised of three cover songs, the project was conceived as a way to explore deeper into the recording process and pay homage to some of their favorite songwriters.
Lee DeWyze
Lee DeWyze
Leon James "Lee" DeWyze, Jr. is an American singer-songwriter from Mount Prospect, Illinois, and the winner of the ninth season of American Idol. Prior to Idol, DeWyze had a solo career and formed the Lee DeWyze Band.
Venue Information:
Codfish Hollow Barnstormers
5013 288th Ave
Maquoketa, IA, 52060
http://codfishhollowbarnstormers.com/